Calligraphy by Stefanie Weigele

Wrapping up an ink sample for a colleague in graphic design and lettering – I hope it arrives safely!
#zillersink #sample #calligraphy #caligrafía #kalligrafie #white #blue

Wrapping up an ink sample for a colleague in graphic design and lettering – I hope it arrives safely!
#zillersink #sample #calligraphy #caligrafía #kalligrafie #white #blue

I have recently been asked What inks are you using, when you write in white or light blue? This needs to be a quite opaque ink, right?

So here’s my answer: Thanks for your question! If I want to write in white, I use Dr. Martin’s Bleedproof White, you can order it for example from Blots Pen & Ink Supplies (UK) or from John Neal Bookseller (USA). I tried a variety of white inks, and this is in my experience the best for writing with pointed pen and regarding opaqueness. (It is also recommended by professional calligraphers of international standing, I learned about it at a workshop with the amazing Barbara Calzolari.) You have to dilute it though to write properly with it!

It goes like this: you add some drops of distilled water, then stir gently with a toothpick only the surface of the ink with the water, until you get some ink with the consistency of cream. For easier use I take out this liquid with a plastic pipette and fill it in a smaller container like a Dinky Dip. Now you can dip your nib and start writing! As you see, this ink makes very fine hairlines and very clean, precise writing possible. 

For other light colors I like to use Ziller’s inks, they come in 10 colors which are mixable. The process is basically the same as with the Bleedproof White – these inks also need to be diluted (but not so heavily), so that they don’t blot or drop, or produce too thick lines. They are also waterproof once dry! Nearly all colored scripts you see in my blog are written with Ziller’s inks.

Of course you can also use Artist’s or Calligraphy Gouache – I just don’t have so much experience with those.

So have fun – writing in white is beautiful!

My post for @imheebs most generous giveaway contest!! I am not sure if the style fits the content, but I’m working on a somewhat looser script and can’t do anything more formal at the moment … it’s about one of my favourite fictional characters, Dr. Daruwalla from John Irving’s Son of the Circus.

My post for @imheebs most generous giveaway contest!! I am not sure if the style fits the content, but I’m working on a somewhat looser script and can’t do anything more formal at the moment … it’s about one of my favourite fictional characters, Dr. Daruwalla from John Irving’s Son of the Circus.

#Latergram of an envelope to a pen pal, I hope it arrived already by now!

#Latergram of an envelope to a pen pal, I hope it arrived already by now!

#latergram of a letter to a dear, talented and generous penpal far, far away, that finally arrived!

#latergram of a letter to a dear, talented and generous penpal far, far away, that finally arrived!

… and here’s a close-up from the previous post!

… and here’s a close-up from the previous post!

Here’s some quick pencil practice in Business Writing, I’m using the exemplar of Stephen A. Ziller. I admit that after many months of (rather casual) practice this starts to feel like actual handwriting!

Here’s some quick pencil practice in Business Writing, I’m using the exemplar of Stephen A. Ziller. I admit that after many months of (rather casual) practice this starts to feel like actual handwriting!

More Madarasz style minuscules. Haven’t started to dig into the caps. It’s a lot faster than I usually write … but I lose precision. It seems to speed me up!

More Madarasz style minuscules. Haven’t started to dig into the caps. It’s a lot faster than I usually write … but I lose precision. It seems to speed me up!

Trying my hand at Madarasz script! This needs a lot of work, spacing, width of the shades etc., but it’s a lot of fun!! In his own words: “Don’t be misled into practicing the slow, pen-lifting style …” – so let’s just say for someone who practiced that slow style a lot (and will continue to do so), this is very refreshing 😉. Ah, and I re-watched the “Prisoner of Askaban” last night, hence the Harry Potter references.

Trying my hand at Madarasz script! This needs a lot of work, spacing, width of the shades etc., but it’s a lot of fun!! In his own words: “Don’t be misled into practicing the slow, pen-lifting style …” – so let’s just say for someone who practiced that slow style a lot (and will continue to do so), this is very refreshing 😉. Ah, and I re-watched the “Prisoner of Askaban” last night, hence the Harry Potter references.

Some more pencil practice on a back side of a practice sheet – I’ve started to go again through all the Spencerian minuscules.

Some more pencil practice on a back side of a practice sheet – I’ve started to go again through all the Spencerian minuscules.